Out of all my pet peeves when it comes to verses taken out of context, Matthew 18:20 ranks at the top.  The verse says, “For where two or three are gathered in my name, there I am among them.”

Let me tell you what it does not mean.  It does not mean that Jesus is more present or more gracious when a group gathers for prayer. If you believe that, you 1) have never read the passage, and 2) are wrong.

Here’s what the verse says in its full context, Matthew 18:15-20 in the English Standard Version:

“If your brother sins against you, go and tell him his fault, between you and him alone. If he listens to you, you have gained your brother. But if he does not listen, take one or two others along with you, that every charge may be established by the evidence of two or three witnesses. If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church. And if he refuses to listen even to the church, let him be to you as a Gentile and a tax collector. Truly, I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. Again I say to you, if two of you agree on earth about anything they ask, it will be done for them by my Father in heaven. For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I among them.”

Jesus is teaching his disciples about church discipline. In the context, verse 20 means that when Jesus’ disciples agree on a matter of church discipline concerning an unrepentant church member, Jesus will be divinely present among them as they seek Christ-like unity and wisdom in making  their decision.

That’s what the verse means. Plain and simple.  So the next time the big-haired church lady with a tambourine tries to guilt you into showing up at the 5 am prayer time by quoting Matthew 18:20, you’ll know how to (lovingly) respond.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Biggest Out of Context Pet Peeve: Matthew 18:20

  1. Good one, James. My pet peeve is Jeremiah 29:11. I taught my daughter how that one is so often misinterpreted by otherwise biblically sound people and now it is a running joke because it shows up so often.

  2. Thanks for the insight James. I have never really encountered anyone who has really talked about the passage before. I could see how someone would take that wrong.

Join the Conversation

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s