Day 4: The True King

For to us a child is born, to us a son is given;      and the government shall be upon his shoulder. (Isaiah 9:6) Every four years in the United States we are reminded that no one leader will rule forever. Even in countries where there are dictators or monarchs, they eventually die and someone else comes into power. Human government, while good and ordained by God, is not ultimate. It’s easy to forget this. Sometimes, here in America, we think if we only had the right president, then we’d be able to stop terrorism. Then we’d solve racial … Continue reading Day 4: The True King

Jesus: Prophet, Priest, King

If you had three words to describe Jesus, which words would you use? Gentle? Lord? Master? Kind? Loving? Gracious? Truthful? Teacher? Savior? Compassionate? These descriptors are all true, of course. The truest of true! But I want to challenge you to think big picture, and consider the background of the Old Testament–which all points to Jesus (see John 5:29; Luke 24:24-27, 44). In the Old Testament, there were only three offices in Israel: prophet, priest, and king. Jesus is the ultimate fulfillment of these offices, so whenever we read about them in the Old Testament, we need to keep one … Continue reading Jesus: Prophet, Priest, King

Yahweh the King

Part 4 in a 6 part series. View series intro and index. If there was one thing the king of Israel was to be, it was a reflection of Yahweh’s kingship. The king was Yahweh’s “vice regent.” In Book IV (chs. 90-106) there is a decidedly noticeable shift toward the focus on Yahweh as king.[1] If Ps. 89 indeed depicts the supposed failure of the covenant and disabling of the monarchy (see previous post), it makes sense for Book IV to embrace the shift back to Yahweh. Psalms 93-99, often called “enthronement psalms,” are the showcase songs for Yahweh’s kingship. This small … Continue reading Yahweh the King

Covenant: A Strategy for Singing the Psalms

Part 2 in a 6 part series. View series intro and index. In order to properly understand the Psalms and sing them with saints of old, we must employ the right strategy. In other words, we need to have a proper biblical and theological hermeneutic (i.e. interpretive grid). As I mentioned in the last post, I propose that the Davidic covenant (see 2 Sam. 7:12-16) is the lens through which the entire book of Psalms should be read. For the most part, the Psalms are a collection of royal prayers and petitions.[1] Because covenants in the OT are based on the vassal … Continue reading Covenant: A Strategy for Singing the Psalms

Psalm 45 and Jesus

This is a love psalm for a royal wedding. The king is praised for his appearance and speech (v. 2), his military power (v. 3), and his work of justice (vv. 4-5). The psalm turns to God in verses 6-9 where God is praised because his throne is the perfect throne. God’s throne is “forever and ever” and he rules with “uprightness” because he “loved righteousness and hated wickedness” (vv. 6-7a). The pslamist then says something strange. He says that God has anointed the God mentioned in v. 6. It’s evident to the reader that this is dealing with more than … Continue reading Psalm 45 and Jesus